Blue Water Spear Fishing

 

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Dive Hatteras offers not just trips for SCUBA divers, but we can take you and your group out for a day of Spearfishing as well.  The waters off Hatteras offer spearos an environment that is not matched by any other location in the Mid-Atlantic.  

The confluence of the Gulf Stream and Labrador provide us with a variety of resident and pelagic species to hunt.  Our numerous shipwreck sites provide the necessary structure for the fish to congregate and the Gulf Stream will bring in the big pelagic species.  The Gulf Stream edge and associated currents will also create large mats of Sargasso grass and these make an ideal location for drift hunting the deep blue water.  

The primary species that we encounter on the wreck sites are the reef complex fishes of groupers and snappers, spade, triggerfish, cobia, greater and lesser amberjack, blue and rainbow runners, sheepshead, flounders, etc.  A variety of pelagic species frequent our sites as well to include tunas, mahi, wahoo, african pompano, and many other game fish.  The reality is that you never know just what will show up on a Hatteras wreck site, North Atlantic or Gulf Stream Pelagic - on occasion we get them all.

The boat has all the required federal and state permits to allow sport fishing and spearing without the divers having to obtain individual permits.  You may spear any non-protected specie that you might encounter provided they are in season, up to the the daily game limits (excluding Giant Blue Fin Tuna).  

The captain and crew understand the sport and have participated in several of the Hatteras Blue Water Open tournaments in the past.  We understand the challenge and enjoy the sport ourselves.  

To spear from our boat you are required to use common sense as well as normal safety precautions while handling and using your speargun.  Though single diving is allowed, buddy teams of one up, one down are preferred.  Free shaft if you choose, but this is not the Florida Keys and I suggest a gun with a line reel and a surface float for free diving.

The boat has proper racks for your guns and plenty of other safe areas to store extra guns, shafts and other gear.  Tip covers are expected to be used when spears are on the boat.  The use of power-heads is discouraged, but not prohibited provide proper safety precautions are followed.

Diver John Ratay with a large African - Dive Hatteras Photo

Diver John Ratay is pretty stoked about this large African Pompano. He took it with one good shot while diving at the Dixie Arrow.  

No "Florida Stretch" needed in this photo!

Medium sized Cubera Snapper was taken by Capt Rich while on SCUBA. - Dive Hatteras photo

Captain Rich shows off the Cubera Snapper he snapped up at the Keshena wreck.  These big "dog tooth" snappers have scales like armor plating and you have to hit them just right.  Dive Hatteras photo.

 

Cliff has a very nice Cobia for dinner - Dive Hatteras Photo

Cliff used his OMER gun to get this big Cobia.

 This is just one example that the "Cobia Slayer" has brought to the boat.

Our boat is well designed for both SCUBA and free diving, big and comfortable with a walk-through transom door and a very wide strong dive platform.   There is always a proper fins on ladder to make getting back on board fast and easy.

 

Plenty of deck space means no crowding and our large SSI cooler can hold some really big fish!  If you fill that, there is an under deck live well that can also hold big fish and ice.

 

Operating from the flybridge allows us to keep a close eye on freedivers without being right on top of them.  We will still be ready to move in and help out if the action gets a bit too tough and the diver needs a pickup.

 

Being a dive boat we are very good at operating around divers in the water and can do so safely and efficiently.  We know how to get freedivers in and out of the water quickly and safely, dropping you in the right spot to make the most out of the drift over the hot spot at the wreck sites.  

The tasty African Pompano swim close by - Dive Hatteras photo

A school of African Pompano swim past.

Curiosity kills not just the cat...

If you want to set up a blue water hunting expedition you need to do some planning and get on our schedule.  First thing would be to contact us and talk about the type of diving you want to do, when you want to do it, so we can discuss the details and costs.

For all spear fishing trips, we can provide the large coolers and ice for the catch.  If you wish to SCUBA, we have all the necessary equipment on board to do so safely.  For freediving excursions, we often remove tank racks for additional deck space along the gunnels but leave the dressing bench in place. 

A thorough briefing is given prior to departure for either type of trip that covers what to expect and the diving conditions of the day to make your trip as safe and of course as productive as possible.

E-mail or call us at 703-517-3724 to get started setting up a blue water hunting expedition for you and your dive buddies.

Cliff boats another big Flounder - Bruce Wilkens Photo

Cliff boats another barely legal flounder.    

He said that he couldn't get the big ones he saw, so he had to settle for this little one.

Flounder are usually taken on SCUBA as you have to hunt for them around the perimeter of the wreck where they lay camouflaged in the sand . 

Not a good day to be a Pompano - Dive Hatteras Photo

Another Pompano hits the deck.

This one took a hit from a small JBL gun that I usually use for flounder.

Diver Eric Koehler shows off a nice Wahoo that he got near the Proteus wreck site.   Photo courtesy Eric

Diver Eric Koehler shows off a nice Wahoo that was taken near the Proteus wreck.

 

 

Diver Cliff Cason took this grouper at the Manuela - DiveHatteras photo

Cliff Cason boated this good sized Gag with an OMER gun while diving at the 150 foot deep Manuela wreck site in November of 2010.   

The deeper offshore sites generally have more of the really big snapper, scamp and groupers but it takes a higher level of dive experience to make a dive to sites greater than 120 feet.

Diver John Ratay shows off a 38 pound Cobia.

 

Diver John Ratay got this 38 pound Cobia on the Keshena wreck site in July.   There have been a good number of Cobias on the near shore sites for the past month and they average this size and larger.

Tax Man takes their toll....

When the Tax Man shows up, just make your payment.  If you push them off with your gun, they may try and take more than they are due....

Capt. Rich boats a nice Cubera Snapper

Captain Rich strikes again with his OMER Cayman ET gun.  This 39 lb Cubera got shot right thru the head for a real stone shot.  This fish was taken on Sept 16, this year.

Sept 14 to 16 we had a very short 3 day mini-season open up in NC  for Red Snapper, so we took advantage of it and this is just one of the Red fish that came on the boat.  This one that Diver John Ratay brought aboard was 19lbs.  They are plentiful and most are this class size or even bigger.

If you need any spearfishing or freediving gear, contact Mark at Technosport and he can get you covered with some of the best gear available.

 

All Information, Content and Photos contained on the DiveHatteras web site is property of and copyright by DiveHatteras llc, 

Dave and Ann Sommers unless otherwise noted and my not be used without permission.

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